Management Training: What Makes a Person Management Material?

Managers have the enviable – and some would say unenviable – task of overseeing the operation of a business, or the function of a department within a company. These leadership positions are not for those who perform poorly under stress, even though the level of stress executives experience depends entirely on the qualities and skills…

Managers have the enviable – and some would say unenviable – task of overseeing the operation of a business, or the function of a department within a company. These leadership positions are not for those who perform poorly under stress, even though the level of stress executives experience depends entirely on the qualities and skills that possess, these characteristics can be enhanced through leadership development and management training. If a professional possess the skills that are listed below, he or she may be leadership material:

Industry Knowledge. To start with the obvious, managers must have knowledge of the industry in which they work. In many cases, this knowledge does not need to be intense. Many are well served by having a deep knowledge of a particular aspect of their industry, such as project public relations or human resources. Industry knowledge is gained through education and experience – typically in that order.

Self-Motivation. Managers strive to motivate their workers, but they themselves must be self-motivated, as executives seldom have the same motivational duty to managers as the latter have to personnel. If a professional is a self-starter who does not need frequent encouragement to keep a full head of steam, nurturing this quality through management training is a smart idea.

Optimism. Managers may have to make difficult decisions one day, and then show up the next day smiling. They play a larger role in controlling the morale of the business or the corporate department than employees do, since the employees look to them for help in resolving business issues and personal problems relating work. Leadership training can articulate the role of optimism in maintaining morale.

Reliability. At many companies, a manager has the duty of picking up the slack when employees are sick or on vacation. Consequently, they are required to exhibit more dependability and reliability than the average employee does. These hits are demonstrable through the person's work history.

Integrity. In an era when big companies are being called out for their lack of ethics, the merit of integrity is once again a quality that executives are looking for in department leaders. The need for integrity never went away, but companies now feel that they can not depend on just anyone to possess it. Anyone who has a work history that demonstrates integrity is discussed favorably as a managerial candidate.

Active Listening. Everyone has moments when he or she zones out and misses what a college said. For managers, though, these moments must be few because most things that are said are kindly said with respect to the manager position. Not capturing information could put managers at a disadvantage in areas where they need to shine, such as project management and conflict resolution.

Conclusion

The characteristics above are basic hits that every manager needs. If considering a career in management, chances are that some of these exercises have already been acquired. To maximize them – and to add new skills – consider pursuing leadership development and management training, which are available from a provider of facilitation services that offers educational courses.