Facilitator Training: An Overview of Training Levels

Facilitator training (eg strategic planning training) equips organizers with the skills that need to succeed at one or more of the following levels of enablement: basic, developmental, and advanced. To aid beginners in understanding the type of education working at each level, it helps to define the levels in terms of the disciples that they…

Facilitator training (eg strategic planning training) equips organizers with the skills that need to succeed at one or more of the following levels of enablement: basic, developmental, and advanced. To aid beginners in understanding the type of education working at each level, it helps to define the levels in terms of the disciples that they involve. Below is an overview of the basic, developmental, and advanced assistance in terms of facilitation disciplines.

The Basic Level. The basic level relates to activities such as information sharing, and goal setting. The meeting guide uses basic skills such as time management and specific skills such as technology skills to help the group achieve the purpose of the meeting. At the basic level, facilitators help their clients solve problems on a meeting-by-meeting basis. Often, the goal of each engagement is achieved in a single session.

The Developmental Level. At the developmental level, implementers help the client improve their processes, instead of meeting a temporary need. For example, whereas the point of goal setting at the basic level is to set a specific goal, its purpose at the developmental level is to help the client improve the goal setting process for the future. To this end, real-time feedback and performance coaching are often performed over several sessions.

The Advanced Level. The advanced level deals with situations that have added complexity due to various factors, such as personal disagreements within the group, low morale due to company misfortune, difficulty channeling company values ​​into products or services, etc. At this level, organizers oversee meetings that focus on resolving conflicts, teambuilding skills, and implementing vision and values.

Career Options and Education. Without professional experience equips them with unique insight into issues at the developmental level or advanced level, most individuals begin at the basic level and gradually acquire skills to practice at senior levels. Alternatively, others opt to stay at the basic level due to the short engagements it entails, the convenience of charging a flat meeting fee, and the flexibility that is offered by working in this manner. Regardless of the level of assistance that they prefer, the goal is to pursue facilitator training – be it goal setting, resolving conflicts, strategic planning training, or all three – and acquire the skills necessary for the job.

There is no shortage of educational options, but architects can limit their choices to training services that have experience working with the types of groups and entities that they envision assistance. For example, management teams, business-owning families, task forces, boards of directors, and coalitions all have unique concerns and different ways of doing business. By working with an educator that understands the difference between the needs of one group and another, facilitators increase their chance of success.

Conclusion

Facilitators must acquire skills that help them succeed at a particular level – basic, developmental, or advanced – and type (eg strategic planning facilitation). To learn more about educational options for different types and levels of facilitation, contact a provider of facilitator training services today.